Program for Thursday May 13, 2021

Other Session

LUNCH BREAK THURSDAY

  • Date:
  • Time: 12:30pm - 1:30pm
  • Track: Networking

Complimentary lunch available in Exhibit Hall.

Poster Session

POSTER SESSION A

  • Date:
  • Time: 12:30pm - 1:30pm
  • Track: Research
  • Location: Exhibit Hall

View the most current research in geriatrics. Authors will be available to discuss the presented findings and answer questions.

Other Session

ADGAP BUSINESS MEETING

  • Date:
  • Time: 1:30pm - 3:00pm
  • Track: Networking

Other Session

ADVANCE CARE PLANNING PAPER SESSION

  • Date:
  • Time: 1:30pm - 2:30pm
  • Track: Research
  • CME/CE: 1.0

Sponsored by the Research Committee

Moderator:  Elizabeth K. Vig, MD, MPH

This session will present the latest peer-reviewed geriatrics research with questions and answers to follow.  Learning Objectives: (1) discuss new and original geriatrics research; (2) describe an emerging concept or new scientific focus in aging research; and (3) summarize the key findings of projects with relevance to care of older adults.

P12 - Integrated Multidisciplinary Approach to Advance Care Planning for Vulnerable Older Adult within an Accountable Care Organization
Jennifer Gabbard, MD
P13 - Effect of an Innovative Advance Care Planning Clinic for Internal Medicine Residents
Amy Reyes Arnaldy, MD
P14 - Integrating End of Life Decision Making into Primary Care: A Multisystemic Approach
Ashley H. Noriea, MD, MAPP
P15 - Exploratory Study of Community Guardianship Programs
Anthony A. Palillo, AB

 

Symposia

AUGMENTATION THERAPIES FOR DEPRESSION IN OLDER PEOPLE: SCIENCE AND PRACTICE

  • Date:
  • Time: 1:30pm - 2:30pm
  • Track: Clinical Practice
  • CME/CE: 1.0

Moderator: Soo Borson, MD
This session will review the rationale for replacing or augmenting antidepressant pharmacotherapy with non-pharmacological approaches as well as supplemental or alternative medications.  We summarize the evidence supporting existing options, suggest how they can be used in clinical practice, and describe health system design elements that foster comprehensive depression care for older people.  Learning Objectives: (1) name at least 2 types of evidence-based pharmacological interventions to augment antidepressant medication; (2) describe at least 2 types of evidence-based non-pharmacological interventions to augment or replace antidepressant medication; and (3) identify 2 health system design elements that support comprehensive depression care for older adults.

Why We Need Augmentation Strategies in Late-Life Depression Care
Soo Borson, MD
Boosting Resilience to Prevent Depression
Helen Lavretsky, MD


 

Symposia

GLOBAL DEPRESCRIBING UPDATES: LESSONS LEARNED AND NEEDS FOR THE FUTURE

  • Date:
  • Time: 1:30pm - 2:30pm
  • Track: Public Policy
  • CME/CE: 1.0

Sponsored by the Polypharmacy Special Interest Group
Moderator: Nicole J. Brandt, PharmD, MBA, BCGP, BCPP, FASCP
This program will provide lessons learned from interprofessional leaders located throughout the world.  Learning Objectives: (1) describe a framework for deprescribing and what stakeholders need to be involved; (2) list at least 3 challenges that were faced in implementing deprescribing; (3) describe at least 3 tactics or tools to sustain deprescribing; and (4) identify at least 3 action items that need to be taken on a national and international basis.

Canadian Deprescribing Network – Policy Steps 2.0
Cheryl A. Sadowski, PharmD, BCGP, FCSHP
Australian Deprescribing Network Implementation - Lessons Learned
Sarah N. Hilmer, BScMed(Hons), MBBS(Hons,) FRACP, PhD
US Deprescribing Initiatives - Looking Ahead
Cynthia M. Boyd, MD, MPH; Michael A. Steinman, MD

Other Session

LEADERSHIP CURRICULUM: UPWARD OR ONWARD: BUILDING A HIGH-PERFORMING TEAM ON TOP OF A SOLID CULTURE FOUNDATION

  • Date:
  • Time: 1:30pm - 2:30pm
  • Track: Professional Development
  • CME/CE: 1.0

Presenters: Sally L. Brooks, MD, CMO & Curtis M. Davies 

Learning Objectives: (1) explain the importance of laying a foundation of success by evaluating and building your team;(2) establish a culture that drives performance;(3) demonstrate an understanding of learning agility and identify learning agile behaviors; (4) differentiate between "performance" and "potential"; and (5) identify appropriate development activities for your team members (e.g., feedback, coaching, and performance improvement) based on assessment results.
 

Symposia

NARRATIVE MEDICINE: COMMUNICATING TO THE PUBLIC, POLICY MAKERS, AND FUNDERS

  • Date:
  • Time: 1:30pm - 2:30pm
  • Track: Education
  • CME/CE: 1.0

Moderator: Louise Aronson, MD

This session will begin by discussing different forms of written public communication by health professionals, from op-eds and medical journal perspectives articles to research and policy narratives. We then will consider techniques and strategies for success, including how to appeal to your target audience and capitalize on your experience and expertise – techniques that work across all communication and audience types.  Learning Objectives: (1) discuss how media and social media have transformed the ways people and organizations interact, influence one another, and share information; (2) identify different forms of written, oral, and mediated public communication, as well as strategies for appealing to your target audience while capitalizing on your expertise; and (3) explore how clinicians, researchers, administrators, and leaders can leverage narrative and communications fundamentals to communicate more effectively and with more diverse audiences in the 21st century. 

Symposia

NIA SYMPOSIUM FOR RESEARCHERS AT MID-CAREER AND BEYOND – OPPORTUNITIES FOR ESTABLISHED RESEARCHERS

  • Date:
  • Time: 1:30pm - 2:30pm
  • Track: Research
  • CME/CE: 1.0

Sponsored by the National Institute on Aging in cooperation with the AGS Research Committee 
This symposium is intended for independently funded researchers at a mid- to senior career level. It targets the needs of research leaders and established investigators by providing an update from NIA staff on research programs and initiatives.  A question and answer session will follow brief introductory remarks on current funding, new opportunities including those related to Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias, and future priorities and research directions of NIA.  Learning Objectives: (1) describe the current and future research foci of the NIA extramural divisions; and (2) discuss the current funding environment.

Overview of NIA Budget, and Priority Areas
Marie A. Bernard, MD, Deputy Director, NIA

NIA Café
NIA representatives will move to designated tables, organized by division.  Participants will have an opportunity to visit different tables to interact with NIA representatives in small groups or individual conversations.

  • Evan C. Hadley, MD, Director, Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology
  • Kenneth E. Santora, PhD
  • Dana Plude, PhD
  • Eliezer Masliah, MD

Symposia

CPT CODING: BASIC PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE

  • Date:
  • Time: 2:45pm - 3:45pm
  • Track: Clinical Practice
  • CME/CE: 1.0

Speaker: Peter A. Hollmann, MD
This session will help the attendee become aware of coding that is especially relevant to geriatrics health care professionals. Specific topics that will be addressed include: E/M (office and facility visit codes and Medicare Preventive Medicine codes) and overview to coding and billing for the geriatrics professional.  Learning Objectives: (1) describe basic coding principles; (2) discuss key Medicare payment rules; and (3) interpret how to relate these to practice management.

Symposia

DO MORE, DO NOTHING, OR DO LESS: DECISION-MAKING ABOUT BLOOD PRESSURE CONTROL IN OLDER PATIENTS

  • Date:
  • Time: 2:45pm - 3:45pm
  • Track: Clinical Practice
  • CME/CE: 1.0

Sponsored by the Research and the Clinical Practice and Models of Care Committees
Moderator: Mark A. Supiano, MD, AGSF
Despite the profound benefits among older participants in from the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT), and the new recommended treatment threshold of <130 mm Hg, this more intensive treatment target has not been universally accepted. The goal of this symposium is to discuss some of these potential explanations with a particular focus on the question of generalizability of the SPRINT results to the geriatric patient populations that many AGS members care for. Learning Objectives: (1) discuss how the characteristics of SPRINT participants pertain to the population of older adults, and how the cardiovascular and cognitive benefits in SPRINT translate to the population level; (2) define the older adults with hypertension with a “high degree burden of comorbidity and limited life expectancy” for whom “clinical judgment, patient preference, and a team-based approach to assess risk/benefit is reasonable for decisions regarding intensity of BP lowering and choice of antihypertensive drugs” (ACC/AHA 2017 Hypertension Guideline) should be applied; and (3) review how advanced age (> 80 years), gait speed, frailty status, polypharmacy, and the presence of multiple chronic conditions influences SPRINT treatment outcomes.

Generalizability, Population Health Impact, and Cost-Effectiveness of the SPRINT Results to the US Adult Population
Adam P. Bress, PharmD, MS
Challenges in Translating SPRINT Efficacy into Effectiveness
Ronald I. Shorr, MD, MS
Decision-Making About Blood Pressure Control in Older Patients with Mild to Moderate Functional Decline
Nicholas M. Pajewski, PhD


 

Other Session

FRAILTY TO RESILIENCE PAPER SESSION

  • Date:
  • Time: 2:45pm - 3:45pm
  • Track: Research
  • CME/CE: 1.0

Developed by the Research Committee

Moderator:  George E. Taffet, MD

This session will present the latest peer-reviewed geriatrics research with questions and answers to follow.  Learning Objectives: (1) discuss new and original research in geriatrics; (2) describe an emerging concept or new scientific focus in aging research; and (3) summarize the key findings of projects with relevance to care of older adults.

P16 – A Potential Urinary Biomarker To Determine Frailty Status Among Older Adults
Shan Jiang, MD
P17 – Orthostatic Cerebrovascular Response is Altered in Frailty: Findings from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing
Fiachra Maguire, MB BCh, BAO, MSc
P18 – Biomarkers of Metabolic Dysregulation, Inflammation, and Cellular Senescence are Associated with Impaired Physical Resilience After Hip Fracture
Daniel C. Parker, MD
P19 - Sepsis and Chronic Critical Illness are Associated with New or Worsening Frailty: “Induced Frailty”
Michael C. Cox, MD

 

Other Session

GENITOURINARY HEALTH FOR OLDER WOMEN

  • Date:
  • Time: 2:45pm - 3:45pm
  • Track: Clinical Practice
  • CME/CE: 1.0

Moderator: Christine K. Bradway, PhD, CRNP, FAAN, AGSF
Benign urologic conditions (BUCs)—including urinary tract infections, urologic chronic pelvic pain syndrome, conditions associated with lower urinary tract symptoms (e.g., urinary incontinence, frequency, urgency, nocturia), and urinary stone disease (USD)—are common.  Learning Objectives: (1) discuss the role that BUCs may play in development of obesity, diabetes, depression, and hypertension; and (2) explore the relationship between toileting behaviors and UI in women with implications for bladder health. 

Increased Risk of Comorbid Conditions: Uncovering the Hidden Burden of Genitourinary Conditions
Camille P. Vaughan, MD, MS
Toileting Behaviors-Women's Elimination Behaviors in Older Women
Mary H. Palmer, PhD, RN, FAAN, AGSF

Symposia

HOME-BASED ACUTE CARE: THE NEW ACUTE CARE ALTERNATIVE FOR THE GERIATRIC PATIENT

  • Date:
  • Time: 2:45pm - 3:45pm
  • Track: Models of Care
  • CME/CE: 1.0

Moderator: Albert Siu, MD
Not infrequently, as healthcare professionals, we find ourselves asking the question “did this person really need to be admitted.” Often, we are finding the answer to be “no”. To explore other options when caring for patients, especially our older, more frail adults, we present an alternative model of care: home-based acute care.  Learning Objectives: (1) identify components of value-based care models and understand how these models lead to improved quality of care and better concordance with goals of care for older adults; (2) describe home-based acute care models, where they are applicable and how they may benefit older adults’ healthcare needs; and (3) describe practical approaches to implementation of home-based acute care models.

Evolution of Home-Based Acute Care: A Value-Based Model
Albert Siu, MD
Hospital at Home: A Home-Based Acute Care Model
Ana Tuya Fulton, MD, AGSF, FACP & Lidia A. Vognar, MD, MHS, CMD
Roundtable Discussion: Introduction to our West Health Institute and Institute for Healthcare Improvement Experts
Amy R. Stuck, PhD, RN

Symposia

IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE: MOVING MODELS OF CARE FOR OLDER PATIENTS FROM RESEARCH EVIDENCE TO REAL

  • Date:
  • Time: 2:45pm - 3:45pm
  • Track: Research
  • CME/CE: 1.0

Developed by the Research Committee
Moderator:  John A. Batsis, MD, AGSF
Implementation of evidence-based interventions takes an average of 17 years to convert 14% of research findings into routine daily practice. Implementation science is the scientific study of methods to promote the systematic uptake of research findings and other evidence-based practices into routine practice and, hence, to improve the quality and effectiveness of health services.  Learning Objectives: (1) describe implementation science and its relevance in the context of current health policies and agenda as it pertains to older adults; (2) describe research designs that are unique to the field of implementation science; (3) review the key characteristics of designing and evaluating a hybrid type 1 effectiveness-implementation study in the acute care setting; and (4) discuss the key characteristics of designing and evaluating a hybrid type 3 effectiveness-implementation study in the community care setting.

Relevance and Key Components of Implementation Science in Ageing Research 
Leah L. Zullig, PhD, MPH
Implementation of Geriatric Co-Management in Cardiac Patients 
Mieke Deschodt, RN, PhD, FEANS
Implementing the Collaborative Dementia Care Model in the Real World 
Malaz A. Boustani, MD, MPH
Panel Discussion and Q&A 

Workshop

JOINT INJECTION WORKSHOP: KNEE, SHOULDER AND HIP II

  • Date:
  • Time: 2:45pm - 3:45pm
  • Track: Clinical Practice
  • CME/CE: 1.0

Ticketed session. No additional fee.
Facilitators: Shobhana A. Chaudhari, MD, FACP, AGSF; Ashok P. Chaudhari, MD; Estrella Roffe, MD, AGSF; Julio A. Martinez-Silvestrini, MD
After a brief demonstration of joint injection techniques by faculty, participants will practice the injections on joint models with faculty support. Learning Objectives: (1) demonstrate ability to inject the knee; (2) demonstrate ability to inject the shoulder; and (3) demonstrate ability to inject Trochanteric Bursa.

Section

JUNIOR FACULTY RESEARCH CAREER DEVELOPMENT SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP BUSINESS MEETING

  • Date:
  • Time: 2:45pm - 3:45pm
  • Track: Networking

Chair: Brienne Miner, MD, MHS
The Junior Faculty Research Career Development Special Interest Group is for junior faculty members and research fellows pursuing a career in aging-related research. At this meeting, we will elect our leadership for the coming year and discuss ideas for a symposium submission. This SIG is a great way to network with other early career researchers and become involved with AGS. 

Other Session

HENDERSON STATE-OF-THE-ART LECTURE: LEVERAGING THE POTENTIAL OF INTERPROFESSIONAL TEAMS IN PRIMARY CARE PRACTICE

  • Date:
  • Time: 4:00pm - 5:00pm
  • Track: Clinical Practice
  • CME/CE: 1.0

Speaker: Ellen Flaherty, PhD, APRN, AGSF

Poster Session

PRESIDENTIAL POSTER SESSION B & RECEPTION

  • Date:
  • Time: 5:00pm - 6:00pm
  • Track: Research
  • Location: Exhibit Hall

The Presidential Poster Session and Reception features posters that received the highest rankings from abstract reviewers. Posters will be judged and one poster in each category will be chosen to receive a “Best Poster” award.  Light refreshments will be served.

Other Session

GUIDED SCIENCE & INNOVATION POSTER WALKING TOUR

  • Date:
  • Time: 5:30pm - 6:00pm
  • Track: Research
  • Location: Exhibit Hall

Sponsored by the Research Committee
The honored Henderson Award recipient will lead an interactive walking tour of exciting posters, featuring new discoveries, novel models of care, or other innovations in geriatrics.  Each stop on the tour will involve a brief discussion with the poster presenter about the main findings and clinical implications of the work. The walking tour will launch from the AGS Marketplace Booth in the Exhibit Hall at 5:30 PM. If you arrive late, you can catch up with the tour by picking up a handout at the Marketplace.